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Monday, July 1, 2013

Ford Taunus Transit FK1000

Ford Taunus Transit FK1000 Front
(12 pictures in gallery)

Ford Taunus Transit FK1000 in 1959, has been fully restored. And its perfect state certified by FIVA (Fédération Internationale des Véhicules Anciens, founded in 1966 in France as an international federation of clubs and organizations on historic vehicle owners). The car has new paint and all new interior.

Car details
Brand: Ford
Model: Taunus Transit FK1000
Engine: 1.5
Power: 52 hp
Transmission: Manual
Fuel Type: Petrol
Mileage: n/a
Number of doors: 4
Equipment: new pain, new interior, new battery

Form of sale: auction
Current price: 10250,00 EUR (07/01/13)

Photo gallery


01 Ford Taunus Transit FK1000

02 Ford Taunus Transit FK1000

03 Ford Taunus Transit FK1000

04 Ford Taunus Transit FK1000

05 Ford Taunus Transit FK1000

06 Ford Taunus Transit FK1000

07 Ford Taunus Transit FK1000

08 Ford Taunus Transit FK1000

09 Ford Taunus Transit FK1000

10 Ford Taunus Transit FK1000

11 Ford Taunus Transit FK1000

12 Ford Taunus Transit FK1000
Source: ebay.de

Video in YouTube




Known in Germany as the "first generation" Transit

Unlike the British-built Transit "family", the first production Ford to wear the "Transit" badge was a van built in Ford's Köln (Cologne) plant in Germany. It was introduced in 1953 as FK 1000 (Ford Köln carrying 1,000 kg). From 1961, this vehicle was called the Ford Taunus Transit. Production of this model ceased in 1965. Unsurprisingly, it bore a striking resemblance to its main rival from VW. Quite unlike the, much more stylish, Thames 400E, produced in the UK at the same time, which was the direct ancestor of the UK Ford Transit.

Naming system

The German vehicle was not widely exported, and the "Mark 1" tag has commonly been applied, retrospectively, to the 1965 to 1978 British model (see below). Whilst there have been four basic Transit platforms since 1965, the various facelifts and upgrades over the years have been referred to using a conflicting range of "Mark" numbers, with some sources counting a facelift as a new "Mark", some not. Ford's own historical look back at Transit production, published for the launch of the 1994 model, avoids the issue by referring to generations of Transit by years produced. This article attempts to make mention of all the common naming systems.
Source: wikipedia